Article – Richard Marx – Dallas News

Jun 09 2010
By: chimarx4
Categories: News
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http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/ent/stories/DN-marx_0609gd.ART.State.Edition1.2998ba5.html

Pop music: Richard Marx likely to mine his hits in concert with Dallas Symphony Orchestra

12:00 AM CDT on Wednesday, June 9, 2010

By MARIO TARRADELL Music Critic mtarradell@dallasnews.com

No matter where you were or what you were doing between 1987 and 1994, chances are you were hearing a Richard Marx song on the radio. And you sang along. Come on, you know you did. The Chicago-born Marx owned the airwaves during that period with a slew of hits, including a trio of No. 1 pop singles, most of which came from his pen.

Marx has also written and produced music for stars such as Kenny Rogers, Barbra Streisand, Sarah Brightman and the late Luther Vandross. Marx has sold more than 9 million albums in the United States, including his multiplatinum monsters Richard Marx (1987) and Repeat Offender (1989).

He’s got a one-night-only gig at the Meyerson Symphony Center on Thursday. The show will feature Marx with the Dallas Symphony Orchestra. He’ll play guitar and piano. What’s the set list? Why, the hits, or course. Here’s a quick look at six tunes we know Marx will be singing.

“Right Here Waiting” – Perhaps his most beloved romantic ballad, it was No. 1 in 1989. Largely composed on piano, it should be nicely embellished by the DSO strings.

“Endless Summer Nights” – A No. 2 smash in 1988, it has a cascading pop-R&B groove that works well with the summery vibe of the lyrics.

“Don’t Mean Nothing” – The pop-rocker that launched his career in 1987, peaking at No. 3. It’s probably his angriest song, a slam at the superficial star-making Hollywood machine.

“Hold On to the Nights” – His first No. 1 single on the pop charts, and another signature ballad with a bittersweet tinge. Again, should play nicely with the DSO’s strings section.

“Take This Heart” – Taken from 1991’s mature effort Rush Street. The rhythmic, breezy pop number didn’t reach the No. 20 mark until 1992.

“Now and Forever” – A latter staple, from 1994’s Paid Vacation, this sweet, quiet ballad put the cap on Marx’s massive pop chart dominance. It stands as his final top 10 hit. Plan your life

Richard Marx and the Dallas Symphony Orchestra perform at 7:30 p.m. Thursday at the Meyerson Symphony Center,

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